Artificial Skin Grafts May Prevent Diabetes in Humans

Genetic engineering has been able to produce unusual solutions to serious physiological problems, but a lot is still in the testing phase. The novelty now, which has been developed by researchers at the University of Chicago, may be the solution to the problems of diabetes in a relatively straightforward way: using artificial skin grafts with the altered DNA structure.

To prove if this is indeed possible, the scientists performed tests on laboratory mice. First, the animals had their stem cells altered as infants so that it was feasible to control the levels of insulin produced by their pancreas. Then they were subjected to different diets, from greasier to healthier.

Less appetite, more health

In the cases of rats that ate more damagingly (considering that obesity

Genetic engineering has been able to produce unusual solutions to serious physiological problems, but a lot is still in the testing phase. The novelty now, which has been developed by researchers at the University of Chicago, may be the solution to the problems of diabetes in a relatively straightforward way: using artificial skin grafts with the altered DNA structure.

To prove if this is indeed possible, the scientists performed tests on laboratory mice. First, the animals had their stem cells altered as infants so that it was feasible to control the levels of insulin produced by their pancreas. Then they were subjected to different diets, from greasier to healthier.

Less appetite, more health

In the cases of rats that ate more damagingly (considering that obesity is one of the major causes of type 2 diabetes), modified skin grafts prevented them from developing the disease.

The method uses a gene that encodes the hormone called glucagon-like peptide 1, or GLP-1. It is responsible for decreased appetite and for regulating the level of blood sugars.

Still far from being a definitive solution to diabetes, the method shows that the use of genetically modified skin grafts can help to develop cures for health problems in a more lasting way and with fewer side effects.

Silicon Heart Made in 3D Printer Already Functions as Real Organ

The brief future will be much better than relying on 3D printer initiatives, especially in the areas of medicine and health. In this case, researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a silicone heart that functions as a real organ.

According to the researchers, the heart made in the 3D printer may be used soon for patients who need a temporary heart. For example, those who expect a real organ transplant.

This heart was developed in a unique and solid silicone structure. According to the research, it is much superior to the mechanisms currently used to simulate the organ, this because it has no metals and plastics, which are susceptible to complications.

Because it is done on a 3D printer, it is possible to print a heart of the required size that fits the patient. The item still has the left and r

The brief future will be much better than relying on 3D printer initiatives, especially in the areas of medicine and health. In this case, researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a silicone heart that functions as a real organ.

According to the researchers, the heart made in the 3D printer may be used soon for patients who need a temporary heart. For example, those who expect a real organ transplant.

This heart was developed in a unique and solid silicone structure. According to the research, it is much superior to the mechanisms currently used to simulate the organ, this because it has no metals and plastics, which are susceptible to complications.

Because it is done on a 3D printer, it is possible to print a heart of the required size that fits the patient. The item still has the left and right ventricles, separated by a chamber that can be inflated to mimic contractions of the blood.

In the tests, the team managed to keep the heart functional with 3,000 hits. This allows a patient to stay alive for 30 to 45 minutes. That is: it is still far from ideal, but the path has already been opened.

Fast, Furious And Flying: The World’s Fastest Drone Passes 280 km/h

The fight for being the fastest is not reserved for traditional means: if you depend on the Drone Racing League, which organizes racing competitions between drones, the dispute will also be among the small flying robots.

The weapon chosen by the DRL, relatively unsatisfied to fly at 130 km / h with its Racer3 – model used by category pilots – was the RacerX, a drone capable of reaching an impressive 289 km / h.

The mark was enough for the ultra-high-speed flying device to be included in the world record book as the world’s fastest drone. For the record, however, the average speed between two passes in the space of 100 meters was considered: the official result was 263.1 km / h.

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The fight for being the fastest is not reserved for traditional means: if you depend on the Drone Racing League, which organizes racing competitions between drones, the dispute will also be among the small flying robots.

The weapon chosen by the DRL, relatively unsatisfied to fly at 130 km / h with its Racer3 – model used by category pilots – was the RacerX, a drone capable of reaching an impressive 289 km / h.

The mark was enough for the ultra-high-speed flying device to be included in the world record book as the world’s fastest drone. For the record, however, the average speed between two passes in the space of 100 meters was considered: the official result was 263.1 km / h.

Performance is possible thanks to four 2500 kV TMotor F80 2407 engines that make the small propellers turn at an impressive 46,000 revolutions per minute.

For DRL competitions, the average speed should remain a little lower – after all; it’s hard enough to see drones flying at half RacerX’s top speed.

Scientists Want to Recharge Batteries With Body Energy

Batteries are a weakness of the mobile industry. Increasingly powerful, mobile devices require smart solutions to take better advantage of battery power and also recharge faster the power repository of a tablet or smartphone.

Thus, many researchers have sought alternatives to the traditional ways of powering a device. One of the bets is the use of mechanisms capable of collecting energy from the human body, thus dispensing with the use of conventional batteries.

This innovation would be of even greater use in the healthcare industry. If you imagine a device that needs battery power to continue working – like a brain or heart implant – having to remove it to “change the battery” may be something laborious and risky.

“If a device relies on batteries, replacing them would require surgery, then providing medical device resources is a significant advantage and can

Batteries are a weakness of the mobile industry. Increasingly powerful, mobile devices require smart solutions to take better advantage of battery power and also recharge faster the power repository of a tablet or smartphone.

Thus, many researchers have sought alternatives to the traditional ways of powering a device. One of the bets is the use of mechanisms capable of collecting energy from the human body, thus dispensing with the use of conventional batteries.

This innovation would be of even greater use in the healthcare industry. If you imagine a device that needs battery power to continue working – like a brain or heart implant – having to remove it to “change the battery” may be something laborious and risky.

“If a device relies on batteries, replacing them would require surgery, then providing medical device resources is a significant advantage and can really affect people’s lives,” argues the professor at the University of Southern California in the United States, Dina El-Damak.

From the heat

The most obvious method when talking about this is to get energy from the movement, but many scientists do not bet on this mode for a reason also quite evident: not all devices can afford to function only when the carrier is in motion.

One option considered by some researchers is the piezoelectric method, which generates energy from the pressure applied to certain materials.

However, the favorite of scientists is the energy generated from the heat of the human body, something that we never fail to produce while alive. This method is called thermoelectric generation.

An example of this comes from the University of North Carolina, also in the US, where Professor Daryoosh Vashaee created a device capable of capturing the temperature difference a human body and the external environment to transform into electricity.

The big problem of this modality is the amount of energy obtained by the device, always very low and unable to charge a cell phone. Thus, the method can be applied only to objects that are highly energy-efficient, and they consume very little energy.

From friction

There are also initiatives that study energy creation from material friction – triboelectric generation – as the small generator set up by Georgia Institute of Technology professor Zhong Lin Wang. In this method, the researchers developed a wearable device capable of obtaining energy from the movement and friction between objects.

Although any material causes friction, the right choice can result in an even more efficient method than the thermoelectric generation, says Wang. This type of technology could be implemented in technological clothing, but also in body sensors, greatly expanding its possibilities.

Unfortunately, though, it’s hard to imagine that such a novelty will be available in the short term – Wang believes it takes at least three years before his frictional energy generation system hits the market.

Until then, the great example of this branch is the Matrix PowerWatch, a watch that uses thermoelectric generation to function and was created from a collective financing project.

5 Patents of Crazy Technologies That Have Not Turned into Real Products Yet

With the tremendous speed that technology development is currently taking, it is not too difficult to end up losing the all-too-promising notion that is being made by the most creative minds in the world.

Often the news comes in the form of extremely simple ideas, which can be translated into reality almost immediately. Others can become true legends of the industry, disappearing amidst a host of forgotten patents.

After all, what are the most imaginative technologies that have been patented in recent years, but have not yet come close to becoming real products?

The following are some interesting examples, ranging from smartphones with folding screens to computers with injected lenses in their eyes and flying cars.

Folding Displays

Flexible screens are already a reality and have been demonstrated more than once in international events, but the fact is that even after years of rumors and patents of the most varied, we are still waiting for the launch of some TV, tabl

With the tremendous speed that technology development is currently taking, it is not too difficult to end up losing the all-too-promising notion that is being made by the most creative minds in the world.

Often the news comes in the form of extremely simple ideas, which can be translated into reality almost immediately. Others can become true legends of the industry, disappearing amidst a host of forgotten patents.

After all, what are the most imaginative technologies that have been patented in recent years, but have not yet come close to becoming real products?

The following are some interesting examples, ranging from smartphones with folding screens to computers with injected lenses in their eyes and flying cars.

Folding Displays

Flexible screens are already a reality and have been demonstrated more than once in international events, but the fact is that even after years of rumors and patents of the most varied, we are still waiting for the launch of some TV, tablet or smartphone whose can be folded without breaking.

The rumors are not few and some, like the Project Valley of Samsung, even seem tangible, but no official announcements yet.

Screen that mimics materials

In the middle of 2015, Apple recorded the concept of a display that would vibrate at certain frequencies to trick our fingers and give us the same sensation we would have when touching metal, stone, paper, wood, or other materials. The idea would be interesting for applications like games and ebook readers, among many possibilities, but there is still no forecast to see this in any real product.

Microphone Tattoo

Granted to Motorola in late 2013, a patent described a special microphone that could be implanted in people’s throats by means of a neck tattoo that captures the vibrations of sound in the larynx of users. The mechanism can connect to other devices via Bluetooth, NFC or WiFi, in addition to own batteries.

Smart Gloves

Announced by Samsung as an April 1 prank in 2014, the Samsung Finger is a smart glove that would do all the functions of a smartphone, and it gained real patents sometime later. The device would have a flexible display capable of displaying a QWERTY keyboard, would be able to track the movements of its fingers and would have shortcuts in the areas within reach of the big toe. For the time being, it does not seem like anything like that has left the paper.

Flying Car

Early concepts of flying cars are probably older than most of us, but a patent filed by Toyota last year describes an interesting vision for this type of vehicle.

In the document, four wings appear “stacked” above a seemingly common automobile, being able to be spaced or approximated to increase the support provided by the air. The propulsion system is not explained – which indicates that the idea is still far from becoming a reality.

Dutch Startup Wants to Bring Free Hot Water to Homes With Its Servers

It’s no news to anyone that electronics like computers and cell phones generate a lot of heat. Imagine how large-scale corporate servers that generate the heat is great enough to force companies to spend large amounts of resources simply to try to keep their temperatures from reaching absurd levels.

An initiative by a Dutch startup called Nerdalize, however, wants to put an end to it. The idea behind it is simple: what if instead of simply trying to cool those places, the heat of the servers could be put to good use. For example, to heat some people’s houses? That’s what the company is trying to do.

To make this a reality, the startup intends to use a very interesting service. Those interested can pay for installing one of the company’s servers in their home, earning free heating for their shower water. Apparently, Nerdalize sells the space of these servers to profit from other companies.

It is difficult not to give the

It’s no news to anyone that electronics like computers and cell phones generate a lot of heat. Imagine how large-scale corporate servers that generate the heat is great enough to force companies to spend large amounts of resources simply to try to keep their temperatures from reaching absurd levels.

An initiative by a Dutch startup called Nerdalize, however, wants to put an end to it. The idea behind it is simple: what if instead of simply trying to cool those places, the heat of the servers could be put to good use. For example, to heat some people’s houses? That’s what the company is trying to do.

To make this a reality, the startup intends to use a very interesting service. Those interested can pay for installing one of the company’s servers in their home, earning free heating for their shower water. Apparently, Nerdalize sells the space of these servers to profit from other companies.

It is difficult not to give the arm to hope for the idea. After all, according to them, this represents savings of up to $1,1000 a year for people living in a home with this technology. While companies reduce their costs of keeping servers in half since they do not have to invest in a cold place to house the machines. It is not to mention the massive reduction in CO2 emissions that this all turns out to be.

Coming to all the houses?

It is worth noting that this is not the company’s first venture into the matter. Still, in 2015, the company had brought its first product, which consisted of a simple water heater with a single server inside. Unfortunately, the device was available in only five households and was used for only one year. Despite the slowness to operate and the low heating power, it worked.

This time though, Nerdalize wants to do more. So the startup launched a crowdfunding campaign that has already hit its original target of 250 thousand euros. To prove that this works, the startup will also bring their new handsets to 42 Dutch homes, and it would be no surprise to see that number growing soon.

Of course, after all, there is still a long way to go before it really becomes commonplace. As noted by the Verge, issues such as the receptivity of companies to have their data stored in the homes of ordinary people, as well as customers who have their homes frequently visited due to the need for maintenance of the machines, can be a deterrent for the technology to fire.

Even so, with the idea that solves so many problems at once, this initiative may well become one of the most successful in recent times.

More Than Cars: Mercedes-Benz and Vivint to Launch Batteries For Homes

Mercedes-Benz has decided to follow the same path as Tesla and expand its operations with products aimed at energy storage. In partnership with Vivint, specializing in solar energy capture projects, the German automaker launched Energy, its own battery for storage in home energy systems.

The technology used in Energy was tested on the batteries used in the brand’s hybrid vehicles. They are made of lithium-ion and have 2.5 kWh and have the modular capability, which allows users to increase this capacity to up to 20 kWh if they deem it necessary. The battery can either provide additional power at peak times or function as a generator in the event of a fall.

The product will be offered first in the state of California, in the United States, and

Mercedes-Benz has decided to follow the same path as Tesla and expand its operations with products aimed at energy storage. In partnership with Vivint, specializing in solar energy capture projects, the German automaker launched Energy, its own battery for storage in home energy systems.

The technology used in Energy was tested on the batteries used in the brand’s hybrid vehicles. They are made of lithium-ion and have 2.5 kWh and have the modular capability, which allows users to increase this capacity to up to 20 kWh if they deem it necessary. The battery can either provide additional power at peak times or function as a generator in the event of a fall.

The product will be offered first in the state of California, in the United States, and from there it will go to other specific countries. Mercedes-Benz owner Daimler has been investing heavily in the energy part as a way to prepare for the imminent future that will one way, or another involve the cars. In this case, the 10 new electric models that Mercedes plans to launch in the next five years.

The group made a $556 million investment in a second battery factory in Germany. The importance of batteries is part of a new eco-system of recharging electric vehicles and a new approach to energy use in homes as well.