Artificial Intelligence to The Rescue of the Police to Stop the Crime

The US state police in Delaware is preparing to deploy “smart” cameras in its vehicles to help its officers detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, a missing child or a disoriented senior.

David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment, explained that the video streams will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features to “give eyes additional “to patrol agents. “We are helping agents stay focused on their work,” said Hinojosa, who calls the new technology a “steroid-embedded camera.”

Nowadays, more and more companies are offering computer-aided vision technologies. We can mention the Israeli start-up Briefcam, which uses

The US state police in Delaware is preparing to deploy “smart” cameras in its vehicles to help its officers detect a vehicle carrying a fugitive, a missing child or a disoriented senior.

David Hinojosa of Coban Technologies, the company providing the equipment, explained that the video streams will be analyzed using artificial intelligence to identify vehicles by license plate or other features to “give eyes additional “to patrol agents. “We are helping agents stay focused on their work,” said Hinojosa, who calls the new technology a “steroid-embedded camera.”

Nowadays, more and more companies are offering computer-aided vision technologies. We can mention the Israeli start-up Briefcam, which uses artificial intelligence to interpret video surveillance sequences.

“A video is not structured, you can not search it,” says Amit Gavish, executive director of Briefcam in the United States. Without artificial intelligence, he says, “you’d have to watch hundreds of hours of footage using only fast forward and fastback. ”

And to specify that “We detect, follow, extract and classify each object in the video to make a database.” This may allow investigators to quickly find suspects in CCTV footage, a system already used by police in hundreds of cities around the world, including Paris, Boston, and Chicago.

“It’s not just a time saver. In many cases, that would not be possible because people who watch video images become ineffective after 10 to 20 minutes, “he says.

The Russian start-up Vision Labs uses Nvidia’s facial recognition technology to identify shoplifters or troublemakers in casinos. “We can deploy (this technology) anywhere,” enthuses Vadim Kilimnichenko, Project Manager at Vision Labs. His clients also include banks for whom facial recognition can help determine if someone is using a false identity.

The US start-up Deep Science uses the same technology to help traders detect real-time armed robbery by identifying weapons or masked attackers, triggering automatic alarms.

If artificial intelligence can prove so useful, digital rights advocates have not failed to argue their opposition. This is the case, for example, of Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, who believes that the rapid growth of these technologies raises privacy risks and calls for regulatory control over how data is stored.

Some of these techniques may be helpful, but there are huge privacy issues when systems are designed to capture identity and make a decision based on personal data. This is where the problems of profiling, bias, and accuracy come into play.

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